Indie News

              ‘Pet Sematary’ Review: A Chilling Take on Stephen King That Can’t Live Up to Its Source Material — SXSW

              ‘Pet Sematary’ Review: A Chilling Take on Stephen King That Can’t Live Up to Its Source Material — SXSW
              Pet Sematary” was and remains one of Stephen King’s most devastating horror novels — a meditation on grief, guilt, and the distinct way the two are intrinsically linked. King almost didn’t release his novel; his wife Tabitha and his friend Peter Straub thought it was too upsetting, and so it sat on a shelf until King needed a novel to complete his contract with Doubleday. In 1983, “Pet Sematary” was released, and just six years later it hit the mainstream with a film directed by Mary Lambert. Almost 30 years after Lambert’s film, directors Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer (“Starry Eyes”) have collaborated on a new adaptation of King’s novel that succeeds in some areas where the 1989 version failed while ultimately failing to deliver an ending that resonates as deeply as its source material.

              Louis (Jason Clarke) and Rachel Creed (Amy Seimetz) have just relocated with their two children
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              Barbara Hammer, Experimental Filmmaker Who Pioneered Lesbian Cinema, Dies at 79

              Barbara Hammer, an experimental filmmaker revered as one of the pioneers of lesbian cinema, has died at 79. The cause of death is ovarian cancer, according to ARTnews, which Hammer had battled since 2006. She had become a right-to-die advocate in recent years, expressing her wish for “a dignified death” during her performance “The Art of Dying or (Palliative Art Making in the Age of Anxiety)” at the Whitney Museum in New York last October.

              Born May 15, 1939 in Hollywood, Hammer began her 40-year career with 1968’s “Schizy” and directed more than 75 shorts and features. Among them was 1992’s “Nitrate Kisses,” which IndieWire recently named one of the 100 best films directed by women.

              “While the term ‘experimental film’ may seem opaque to laypeople, Hammer’s work is marked by provocative playfulness,” wrote Jude Dry of the documentary. “Her work often explores queer women’s sexuality and sexual subcultures, and her first feature film,
              See full article at Indiewire »

              ‘Hedwig and the Angry Inch,’ ‘War and Peace’ Joining the Criterion Collection

              ‘Hedwig and the Angry Inch,’ ‘War and Peace’ Joining the Criterion Collection
              In good news for fans of Ingmar Bergman and Bruno Dumont, the Criterion Collection has announced its June titles. Three from the Swedish master are making the upgrade from DVD to Blu-ray, with Dumont’s “La vie de Jésus” and “L’humanité” making their Criterion debut. Also joining the collection are John Cameron Mitchell’s “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” George Stevens’ “Swing Time,” and Sergei Bondarchuk’s epic adaptation of “War and Peace.”

              More information below, as well as the ever-alluring cover art:

              A Film Trilogy by Ingmar Bergman

              In 1960, Swedish director Ingmar Bergman began work on three of his most powerful and representative films, eventually recognized as a trilogy. Already a figure of international acclaim for such masterpieces as The Seventh Seal and The Magician, Bergman turned his back on the expressionism of his fifties work to focus on a series of chamber dramas exploring belief and alienation in the modern age.
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              ‘The Inventor: Out For Blood In Silicon Valley’: Tackles Scammer Elizabeth Holmes & Her Fraudulent Theranos Company

              In our newfound cultural fascination with scammers, Elizabeth Holmes is this spring’s belle of the ball. She’s the subject of a mega-popular crime podcast, Jennifer Lawrence is set to portray her on the big screen, and two competing documentaries about her and her failed startup, Theranos, debut this month. HBO‘s offering, “The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley” by “Going Clear” documentarian Alex Gibney, is a straightforward but entertaining tale that will keep both newcomers and Holmes enthusiasts enthralled.

              Continue reading ‘The Inventor: Out For Blood In Silicon Valley’: Tackles Scammer Elizabeth Holmes & Her Fraudulent Theranos Company at The Playlist.
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              ‘The Curse of La Llorona:’ Latest ‘Conjuring’ Universe Entry Rarely Rises Above Standard Haunted House Fare [SXSW Review]

              La Llorona is one of the most well-known, if not the most known tale in Latin American folklore. Generations have heard the harrowing story of the woman who, after her husband left, drowned her kids in a fit of rage, realized what she had done when she came to, and took her own life. Legend states that she kidnaps children and drowns them in the middle of the night, mistaking them for her own.

              Continue reading ‘The Curse of La Llorona:’ Latest ‘Conjuring’ Universe Entry Rarely Rises Above Standard Haunted House Fare [SXSW Review] at The Playlist.
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              ‘Family’ Trailer: Taylor Schilling Joins the Juggalos for the Good of Her Niece

              The Film Arcade has released the trailer for “Family,” writer-director Laura Steinel’s comedy starring Taylor Schilling as a workaholic whose unexpected week of niece-sitting naturally ends at the Gathering of the Juggalos. The “Orange Is the New Black” star isn’t the only one immersing herself in the music and culture of Insane Clown Posse, as newcomer Bryn Vale dons black-and-white face paint. Watch the trailer below.

              Here’s the synopsis: “Kate Stone (Taylor Schilling) is career-focused, and enjoys her life that way. Her brash attitude keeps relationships at arm’s length, making her an outcast in her own right. When her estranged brother calls asking her to babysit her tween niece Maddie, Kate reluctantly agrees to help. But babysitting overnight unexpectedly turns into a week, and Kate’s life spins into chaos. As Maddie reveals stories of being bullied and of wanting to run away and be a Juggalo,
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              ‘The Good Fight’ Season 3 Review: CBS All Access Drama Continues to Get Crazier

              • Indiewire
              ‘The Good Fight’ Season 3 Review: CBS All Access Drama Continues to Get Crazier
              To really appreciate just how insane a show “The Good Fight” has become, it’s worth going back to revisit its big-sister series, “The Good Wife.” The CBS legal drama, which ran for seven seasons beginning in 2009, was notable for being the last broadcast drama to be nominated for Emmys; its status as a CBS series meant that it never had the buzz of “Mad Men” or “Breaking Bad” during its time. But the courtroom shenanigans that revolved around Alicia Florrick (Julianna Margulies) as she returned to the workplace and, year after year, grew more deeply drawn into the nexus of Chicago politics and legal technicalities

              While “Good Wife” was extremely serialized for its time and network, creators Robert and Michelle King were still making 22 episodes a season and leaning on the procedural element more often than not. “Good Fight,” meanwhile… it’s on another planet.

              In many ways, “The Good Fight
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              J.C. Chandor on Being Fired From ‘Deepwater Horizon’ — and Having His Ideas Used Anyway

              J.C. Chandor on Being Fired From ‘Deepwater Horizon’ — and Having His Ideas Used Anyway
              Triple Frontier” is J.C. Chandor’s first film since 2014’s “A Most Violent Year,” and there’s a reason for that long day. Speaking to Uproxx, Chandor said he “basically signed on right to go onto ‘Deepwater Horizon'” after “A Most Violent Year,” meaning he would have made “four movies in five years. And then when that blew up, I realized, ‘You know what? This is a sign. I should just chill out here for a year.’”

              Not that he felt good about it at a time. Chandor describes the experience as “a nightmare. It was a total nightmare. Because I really believed in that movie. You know, the good thing is Pete [Berg] actually got to make sort of a version [of what Chandor was going to make].

              “I never saw it, but I know the script they used was the version that I kind of quit slash got fired over. And then it was one of those things where,
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              Woody Harrelson Was ‘Disappointed’ by ‘True Detective’ Season 2

              Woody Harrelson Was ‘Disappointed’ by ‘True Detective’ Season 2
              The third season of “True Detective” has been widely hailed as a return to form after its disappointing sophomore season, which moved the action from Louisiana to Los Angeles and starred Colin Farrell, Vince Vaughn, Rachel McAdams, and Taylor Kitsch. That may be why Woody Harrelson, who starred alongside Matthew McConaughey in the acclaimed first go-round of the anthology series, has finally spoken about Season 2 — albeit briefly.

              “It was pretty amazing because I had not thought about doing television from the time I did ‘Cheers,’ and then I did like seven episodes on ‘Will and Grace,’” Harrelson told Sunday Today, per Entertainment Weekly. “I was not really wanting to do television. Well, it wasn’t television, it was HBO. So I feel lucky about that. I was, you know, kind of disappointed that the second season wasn’t as…,” he said before cutting himself off. “But now the third season,
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              Human-Rights Attorney Featured in Jafar Panahi’s ‘Taxi’ Sentenced to 33 Years in Prison and 148 Lashes

              Nasrin Sotoudeh, a human-rights attorney featured in Jafar Panahi’s “Taxi,” has received a 33-year prison sentence from the Iranian government. The harsh punishment comes after what Amnesty International describes as “two grossly unfair trials,” bringing Sotoudeh’s total sentence to 38 years. The lawyer and activist most recently earned attention for defending women who protest Iran’s hijab laws.

              Panahi himself is seen as a victim of his country’s government, as he received a six-year prison sentence and 20-year ban on filmmaking in 2010 after being charged with propaganda against the regime. He was also barred from leaving the country. The move was met with widespread condemnation from the international film community, and an ever-defiant Panahi reacted in part by covertly directing four more films — including “Taxi,” which won the Berlin Film Festival’s Golden Bear in 2015.

              Sotoudeh was first imprisoned in 2010, also for spreading what Iranian authorities referred to as propaganda,
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              Peter Jackson Says ‘Kiwis Stand United’ After New Zealand Shooting

              Lord of the Rings” director Peter Jackson said he and his countrymen are “devastated” in the wake of Friday’s mosque shootings in New Zealand, which left 49 dead and many more injured. Jackson — the first and only New Zealand filmmaker to win the Academy Award for Best Director, a feat he achieved with 2003’s “The Return of the King” — most recently helmed the well-received “They Shall Not Grow Old,” a World War I documentary in which he colorized and restored existing footage of what was once dubbed the War to End All Wars.

              “New Zealanders are devastated,” Jackson said in a statement to Variety. “Our hearts go out to all those who have been harmed by this cowardly act of hate. Kiwis stand united in our love and support for our fellow Muslim brothers and sisters. We will do whatever we can to help them heal and rise above this terrible tragedy.
              See full article at Indiewire »

              War Doc ‘Combat Obscura’ Is An Unflinching Microcosm Of War In Afghanistan

              War is “boredom punctuated by moments of terror,” as the old adage goes. Boredom, however, has never made for a good film, which has led to a cinematic century of war presented as an exciting, if horrifying endeavor. And while some films (“Full Metal Jacket” and “Platoon“) edged ever closer to the ghastly reality, and others (“Jarhead“) captured the tedium, none seem to embody the stark duality as “Combat Obscura” so fully.

              Continue reading War Doc ‘Combat Obscura’ Is An Unflinching Microcosm Of War In Afghanistan at The Playlist.
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              SXSW 2019: The 10 Best Film and TV Projects at the Festival

              • Indiewire
              SXSW 2019: The 10 Best Film and TV Projects at the Festival
              In recent years, the SXSW Film Festival has grown in stature to become a key launchpad for many kinds of movies — anticipated studio comedies, edgy documentaries, and low-budget narrative features have all found taken flight at the Austin gathering. The addition of television series has further complicated SXSW’s profile, to the point where both media receive nearly the same level of attention.

              The 2019 edition was an especially fertile example, as Jordan Peele’s horror sensation “Us” kicked off the proceedings with a level of enthusiasm that remained in place in the days ahead, with many other crowdpleasing movies and television shows. Setting aside the obvious, here are some of the biggest highlights.

              The Beach Bum

              Harmony Korine’s unorthodox portrait of jubilant Florida stoner Moondog (Matthew McConaughey) portrays a man whose guiding ambition in life is to find bliss every step of the way. Moondog is a role only
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              ‘The Flash’: Ezra Miller Is Writing His Own Script In A Hail Mary Hope Of Staying On As Character

              After months of a lot of movement, there’s finally some news on “The Flash” front at Warner Bros., but none of it is very promising. The positive, if you want to call it that: ‘Flash’ star Ezra Miller is taking matters into his own hands and writing a new screenplay, and he’s enlisted DC Comics writer Grant Morrison to help. The bad news, Miller, has been clashing with the directors on the project, John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein, who are coming off the very successful and critically well-received WB film, “Game Night,” plus the shine of writing “Spider-Man: Homecoming.” Furthermore, WB is moving in a lighter, more comedic direction—which is precisely what The Flash character is fundamentally and why Daley and Goldstein, who again, already did this kind of thing with ‘Spider-Man,’ were tapped to direct the movie in the first place.

              Continue reading ‘The Flash
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              ‘Alien’ 40th Anniversary Shorts Bring Back the Xenomorph Once Again

              ‘Alien’ 40th Anniversary Shorts Bring Back the Xenomorph Once Again
              The xenomorph is now 40 years old — or at least it would be if Sigourney Weaver hadn’t blasted it out of the airlock. “Alien” is celebrating its 40th anniversary all the same, marking the occasion with a suite of short films that will start screening at fan conventions this week before officially premiering on May 3. You may think that Alien Day — or April 26, as the first entry in the franchise takes place on the fictional planet Lv-426 — would make more sense, but the fat cats at Weyland-Yutani decided otherwise. Watch a trailer for the six shorts below.

              And while you’re at it, read the synopses as well:

              “Alien: Alone” — Hope, an abandoned crew member aboard the derelict chemical hauler Otranto, has spent a year trying to keep her ship and herself alive as both slowly fall apart. After discovering hidden cargo, she risks it all to power up the
              See full article at Indiewire »

              ‘Catastrophe’ Review: Season 4 Gives It to You Straight, ‘Til the Beautiful End

              ‘Catastrophe’ Review: Season 4 Gives It to You Straight, ‘Til the Beautiful End
              When it debuted in 2015, “Catastrophe” quickly made its mark by telling the truth. Everything about Sharon (Sharon Horgan) and Rob (Rob Delaney) getting together happened hard and fast, from their would-be one-night stand to their decision to have the resulting baby to Rob moving across the ocean for Sharon and their child. Accordingly, the couple’s conversations get right to the point — there’s no time to beat around the bush, spare feelings, or otherwise sugarcoat the day-to-day facts of life when your life is intertwined with two others and all three are suddenly hurtling forward at a mile a minute.

              Credit to the co-creators and co-stars, these discussions serve as the entertaining and insightful lifeblood of the series; written with purpose and delivered with tenacity as sharp as the timing, audiences get to watch this fated couple make it work with equal doses of destiny and stubbornness. The language
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              Dealing with Photon Blasts and Iconic Disney Animation in Lighting ‘Captain Marvel’ and ‘Dumbo’

              Dealing with Photon Blasts and Iconic Disney Animation in Lighting ‘Captain Marvel’ and ‘Dumbo’
              [Editor’s note: Spoilers ahead for “Dumbo.”]

              Ben Davis’ versatility was pushed to new heights in “Captain Marvel” and “Dumbo.” Good thing the British cinematographer can easily pivot from the McU (“Guardians of the Galaxy”) to indies because he incorporated a multitude of looks for directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (“Captain Marvel”) and Tim Burton (“Dumbo”). In fact, both movies (shot with the large-format Alexa 65) demanded dual aesthetics: naturalism and hyper-realism for “Captain Marvel” and surrealism and expressionism for “Dumbo.”

              “Superhero movies work when you make a personal connection with the protagonist,” Davis said. “Anna and Ryan come from indies [‘Mississippi Grind’], and the idea of the film was Brie Larson’s journey as Captain Marvel. We wanted a naturalistic look and the camera to be very close to her, so we shot a lot of hand-held work, which intimately helps with that connection. The effects, the fights, the CG work, are always going to be there,
              See full article at Indiewire »

              John Cameron Mitchell’s ‘Hedwig And The Angry Inch’ Finally Comes To Blu-Ray Courtesy Of Criterion In June

              Back in 2001, then-actor John Cameron Mitchell released his directorial debut film (based on his own musical), “Hedwig and the Angry Inch.” The film immediately blew up and became a trailblazing film that put Mitchell on the map as a filmmaker to watch out for. Since then, he’s steadily been acting and filmmaking, and most recently, released the film “How to Talk to Girls at Parties” in 2017.

              Continue reading John Cameron Mitchell’s ‘Hedwig And The Angry Inch’ Finally Comes To Blu-Ray Courtesy Of Criterion In June at The Playlist.
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              ‘It Started as a Joke’ Review: A Sweet Little Doc About Finding Catharsis Through Comedy — SXSW

              ‘It Started as a Joke’ Review: A Sweet Little Doc About Finding Catharsis Through Comedy — SXSW
              Eugene Mirman — a fixture of the comedy world, but known to general audiences as the voice of Gene Belcher on “Bob’s Burgers” — has always had a very particular vision of what comedy can be. A warm and whimsical sort whose jokes (and prop-heavy stand-up) tend to poke fun at the insistent seriousness of being alive, Mirman is the kind of guy who can find humor in just about anything.

              In anything, that is, except for stuffy comedy festivals that function as gatekeepers, and strangle their comics into serving up laughs on an assembly line. So, after laughing with his friends about launching a festival of their own, Mirman decided to produce his own punchline. And lo, in 2008, the Eugene Mirman Comedy Festival was born at the Bell House in Gowanus.

              Read More: SXSW 2019 Recap: One Big Festival or Many? — IndieWire’s Movie Podcast

              The first edition featured a murderer
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              ‘Love Death + Robots’: David Fincher & Tim Miller Present A Beautifully Gratuitous Breath Of Fresh Air [Review]

              Sometimes a good obsession doesn’t go away. And sometimes, it’s just repackaged under a new brand. Take David Fincher who tried to remake “Heavy Metal” circa 2008— re-imagining the classic 1981 erotic sci-fi fantasy animated film based on the iconic magazine of the same aesthetic and spiritual remit. The plan was, employ some of the best filmmakers in the world and director-crowdsource a bunch of animated shorts for a brand-new animated fantasy anthology.

              Continue reading ‘Love Death + Robots’: David Fincher & Tim Miller Present A Beautifully Gratuitous Breath Of Fresh Air [Review] at The Playlist.
              See full article at The Playlist »
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